Friday, 29 July 2016

Simple Secrets to Totally Rocking Your Front Yard

Our front yards say a lot about our houses. Beautiful flowers, shrubs and perennials alongside lush trees - it can create an idyllic scene. Making your front yard look incredible is within your reach. With a few thoughtful changes, you can transform it into something amazing. Here are the secrets to totally rocking your front yard.

Frame Your Door

By now you’ve probably heard about the importance of having a focal point in rooms inside your home. It gives rooms a design purpose and makes them cohesive. The same principle applies outside the home. Framing your door is important. You want to create visual cues that naturally lead people towards it.


You could frame your door using decorative brickwork. And you could use paving stones, from sites like http://georgehill-timber.co.uk/, for the path leading up to it. The most successful path designs are those that keep the front door in sight. But there is scope to allow paths to meander slightly, especially if you have other features in your front yard.

Make It Interesting Year Round

Another secret to totally rocking your front yard is to keep it buzzing all year round. But what does that mean in practice? It involves using a mixture of plants with season bloom and perennials. The most challenging time for any front yard is in the winter months of December, January and February. Sites like https://www.rhs.org.uk/ detail all the plants that thrive and create winter interest. Deciduous shrubs like Abeliophyllum distichum produce beautiful white flowers during February. And Arbutus unedo is an evergreen that displays stunning pink-tinged flowers up to and including December. You can also include climbers in your front yard to decorate garden fences or front walls. Winter climbers, like clematis cirrhosa, produce cream flowers and bloom between November and March. You can also get winter-blooming flowers, like the stunning, blue scilla mischtschenkoana.

Winter plants, especially shrubs, are ideal for drawing wildlife into your front yard during the winter too. They provide a source of wild berries and nuts.


Limit The Number Of Species You Plant

Many front yards end up looking disheveled because they have too many different species of plant. Front gardens, more than back, should be about creating order. And one way to create order is to limit the number of species of plants you use. Restricting the number of species will make the yard appear less like a forest and more formal. Most experts recommend limiting yourself to five different plants. Keep like species together in the same areas.

Use Long Sweeping Beds

Too many gardeners go too small when the plant their front garden beds. Beds in the front garden should be sweeping and lead all the way up to the front door. This maximises the visual impact and frames the path. You might want to do what some gardeners call “anchoring.” This is where you plant a tree or use a wall to frame the beds themselves. Small trees dotted in among the beds can produce a beautiful effect. Try mixing trees that produce crab apples with perennials and seasonal flowers.

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